Harley-Davidson Dyna Glide

The Dyna Glide features Harley-Davidson’s latest chassis, which Harley themselves proudly claim is the result of computer aided design (CAD). But it’s a far cry from the exotic aluminium beam frames favored by the latest Japanese race replicas. This one’s steel, good ol’ US steel, a direct spiritual descendent of an earlier generation of America iron horses.

But the frame is, in its modest way, a new departure for Harley-D as they progress ever-so-cautiously into the future. First seen on the 1991 Sturgis model, it features a refinement of the system of rubber engine mounting previously fitted to Glide and Low Rider models. And for the first time, it is possible for a normal person to ride a Harley at sustained speed without going numb from the wrists down.

Purist might frown. The essence of any Harley is that pounding V-twin beat. Unlike the anodyne whirr of Japanese multis, you’re supposed to feel it. Dyna Glide’s endeavor to offer the best of both worlds: you can tell there’s 80 cubic inches of Milwaukee muscle down there, all right, but it doesn’t put your circulation in a sling.

To ride, these are the smoothest Hogs yet, by a margin. Even sensitive souls will use power outside the Evolution engine’s hitherto rev-range without worrying that the entire bike’s about to fail to bits. Now you can happily ride at low revs where other Hogs quake and shudder. Or at high revs where your fillings used to be in danger of shaking out. Without laying a hand on the engine, rubber mounting has effectively widened the big Vee’s power band.

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